Lanalog at Wave Farm: a video essay

Mike Bullock and Linda Aubry Bullock’s “Lanalog” was a six-hour performance and broadcast event on WGXC 90.7 FM, taking place on 8 August 2015 and originating at Wave Farm in Acra, NY. Lanalog used FM, AM, and natural acoustic to connect performers and video projections located around the Wave Farm buildings and property. The piece explores interference, feedback, and contingency of site; confronts the uneasy relationship of signal to noise in the rural airwaves; and addresses our fading memories of analog television and the uncertain future of analog radio.

Lanalog at Wave Farm, August 2015 from Mike Bullock on Vimeo.

Wave Farm Residency, 31 July – 9 August


Linda* and I will be artists in residence at Wave Farm in the Hudson Valley, starting a week from today. On 8 August we will be premiering a new performance/installation called Lanalog, featuring live performers, sounding porcelain, and – true to the spirit of Transmission Arts central to Wave Farm – AM, FM, shortwave, WiFi, video, and acoustic transmissions up and down the hillside and across the ponds and meadows.

I first did something with Galen and Tom way back in 2000 when they were Free 103.9 FM in Brooklyn, when I played an improvised music gig at their loft, the kickoff of my first tour ever as an improviser. Many thanks to them for inviting us to be a part of the truly remarkable facility – and deep history – of Wave Farm.

Lanalog is our third porcelain-based intermedia installation piece since the fall, after For Violet Oakley (Rotunda, Philadelphia, in October) and Lagan (Vox Populi, Philly, in April).

*aka Aubry Arts – look her up on Instagram!: @aubry_arts

Performance Grant from the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage

I’ve just been awarded a 2015 Performance Grant from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. I’m pretty blown away and very excited to get to work on this. June 2016 will see the Inauguration of The Philadelphia Embassy of the Kingdoms of Elgaland-Vargaland at Crane Arts. And the best part is, I get to work with some of my favorite artists who also happen to be some of my favorite people.

As the Pew Center announcement puts it: “Composer, improviser, and media artist Mike Bullock will join forces with Swedish composers and conceptual artists Leif Elggren, Carl Michael von Hausswolff, and Kent Tankred, and Philadelphia musicians such as Ian Fraser and Bhob Rainey, for a program of electronic music, performance, and installations, expanding Philadelphia’s connection to the international experimental music scene.”

It’s an honor to be included in a frankly mind-blowing array of artists and organizations receiving grants and fellowships. Here’s the complete list.

Three shows in late May


In Late May, I’m playing three concerts in three states on two instruments. If you are in Boston, St. Paul, or Brooklyn, I hope to see you soon.

Wed 20 May: Modular synth solo at Boston, MA’s Waterworks Museum. I’ll be playing a new piece called “Emulation WW.” Opening for “Violin, Viola, Cello,” a new work by violinist Morgan Evans-Weiler, with David Michael Curry (viola) and Vic Rawlings (cello).
Friday 22 May: Modular solo on Jesse Goin’s Crow With No Mouth series in St. Paul, MN. Also on the bill is Asher Tuil in an exceedingly rare live appearance.
Monday 25 May: One of my favorite recurring projects, my contrabass duo with Andrew Lafkas, will be playing at Middle Press in Brooklyn, NY. Andrew and I will also play solo sets.

April at Fourth Wall: New installation: “Lagan”

Visit the gallery site here: Fourth Wall at Vox Populi

To cap our run as guest curators of Vox Populi’s Fourth Wall space, we present Lagan, an installation work combining resonant porcelain sound tubes, video, and lighting.

Lagan is a nautical term for cargo thrown from a ship and marked with a buoy, which rests on the sea floor waiting to be reclaimed. Even memories can be purposely submerged, their location saved, to be salvaged later. In the intervening period (has it been months? years? a lifetime?) they have been transformed, just as jettisoned cargo has attracted corals, lush seaweed, and colorful fish.

In creating Lagan, we find ourselves returning to deeply-rooted techniques and images of distant friends and places left behind, viewing and hearing them as they are in the process of submerging, transforming, and surfacing again with new layers of meaning and beauty.

Lagan 1